A Tumblr page.
I post stuff I like.
If you want to know what I like, look slightly to your right.

Btw, I'm the little boy up there in the seersucker. Total badass I know. You're welcome.

 

I really need to stop spilling ethidium bromide on my forearms while I work.
Otherwise, I’ll have cancer by the time I turn 18

Reduce, reuse, recycle!

I’m probably going to get benzene poisoning for using that specific tip box, but whatever.

Played 969 times

Start playing this then scroll through your news feed.

It’s amazing <3

(Source: royahie)

in--omnia---paratus asked
hey! i read your post on the pwnthesat page. i was just wondering how on earth you managed such a high score increase, and if you feel its possible to do the same in one summer. sorry for being weird, but my curiosity is getting the best of me.

Hey, I really want to help you, but my dad’s with me right now and I can’t really do a good job of explaining it.

I’ll get back to you about it tonight though!

It’s the same picture, pretty much from the same angle. I just took it over and over again

sciencesoup:

Interplanetary Superhighway
For thousands of years, navigators have used the stars to find their way, but in recent years, GPS has all but eliminated the challenge of navigating the Earth’s surface. Today’s navigational problems are in space—and JPL research scientist Martin Lo has conceived an interesting and mathematically viable idea for navigating amongst the planets: an ‘Interplanetary Superhighway.’ Most missions take advantage of the way gravity speeds up a spacecraft as it swings by a planet or moon, but Lo’s idea takes advantage of something else—Lagrange points, which are the points between celestial objects where their gravitational pull is cancelled out. These points leave paths of ‘gravity voids’ through which spacecraft can travel without having to fight the pull of gravity, so just a tiny expenditure of energy would propel the craft, slashing the amount of fuel it needs to move. The Earth-Moon system has five Lagrange points, which connect to similar ones between other planets and moons, creating subtle pathways that link the solar system—imagine a network of virtual tubes, snaking through space like a freeway but constantly shifting as the planets orbit the sun. Even though travelling along these would be slower than more direct routes, and they do not guarantee easy access to every part of the solar system, this potential Interplanetary Superhighway requires minimal energy and therefore minimal fuel—a huge advantage for future unmanned deep-space missions.

It would be like the Futurama transport tubes with spaceships!(Or maybe like a ton of interplanetary slingshots&#8212;I&#8217;m not positive which.  I can&#8217;t really get into too much detail atm or do any background research because I&#8217;n currently announcing/commentating for a basketball game.While on that subject, there&#8217;s literally a girl playing tonight named, and I&#8217;m not kidding, &#8220;SheNasty&#8221;.  Who does that to their kid?Like that&#8217;s not even a bad name. That&#8217;s a direct insult. Anyway, cool space thing.  Check it out.)

sciencesoup:

Interplanetary Superhighway

For thousands of years, navigators have used the stars to find their way, but in recent years, GPS has all but eliminated the challenge of navigating the Earth’s surface. Today’s navigational problems are in space—and JPL research scientist Martin Lo has conceived an interesting and mathematically viable idea for navigating amongst the planets: an ‘Interplanetary Superhighway.’ Most missions take advantage of the way gravity speeds up a spacecraft as it swings by a planet or moon, but Lo’s idea takes advantage of something else—Lagrange points, which are the points between celestial objects where their gravitational pull is cancelled out. These points leave paths of ‘gravity voids’ through which spacecraft can travel without having to fight the pull of gravity, so just a tiny expenditure of energy would propel the craft, slashing the amount of fuel it needs to move. The Earth-Moon system has five Lagrange points, which connect to similar ones between other planets and moons, creating subtle pathways that link the solar system—imagine a network of virtual tubes, snaking through space like a freeway but constantly shifting as the planets orbit the sun. Even though travelling along these would be slower than more direct routes, and they do not guarantee easy access to every part of the solar system, this potential Interplanetary Superhighway requires minimal energy and therefore minimal fuel—a huge advantage for future unmanned deep-space missions.

It would be like the Futurama transport tubes with spaceships!
(Or maybe like a ton of interplanetary slingshots—I’m not positive which. I can’t really get into too much detail atm or do any background research because I’n currently announcing/commentating for a basketball game.

While on that subject, there’s literally a girl playing tonight named, and I’m not kidding, “SheNasty”. Who does that to their kid?
Like that’s not even a bad name. That’s a direct insult.

Anyway, cool space thing. Check it out.)